So, I’ve seen other people using plain GitHub repos as a CMS. I’m not refering to static-site generators, or hacks like this one. I’m talking about text files uploaded to GitHub as if they were part of the codebase of a project.

In addition to git, GitHub lets you add, edit, and delete files using a browser. And Markdown files are automatically rendered into HTML. So it does make sense somehow. But I’ll have to see how it works for me.

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For some reason, I set up ISC DHCP server on an RPi to handle my dhcp at home, but it feels too complicated for my setup. I’ll probably change it to dnsmasq, which I’m much more familiar with. http://yiqingsim.net/post/103165692292/setting-up-dnsmasq-as-a-dnsdhcp-server-on-a

I should also write a blog post about my custom surveilence system and angelcam. Angelcam rocks.

In general, there are a lot of things I should probably blog about, regarding my home setup: VPN, Philips Hue lights, network setup, backups…

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Oh, I’m also flirting with the idea of a soundbar for our TV (a new, but really, really dump TV). A hard requirement is pass-through HDMI, because our TV does not have an optical or HDMI output.

These look promissing:

  • http://www.panasonic.com/uk/consumer/home-entertainment/sound-bars/sc-hte80eb.html
  • http://www.sony.com/electronics/sound-bars/ht-xt1

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a16z Podcast: All about Microservices

“Incremental change may be good theory, but in practice you have to have a big enough stick to hit everybody with to make everything move at once”. So shares Adrian Cockcroft, who helped lead Netflix’s migration from datacenter to the cloud — and from monolithic to microservices architecture — when their streaming business (the “stick”!) was exploding.

So how did they — and how can other companies — make such big, bet-the-company kind of moves, without getting mired in fanatical internal debates? Does organizational structure need to change, especially if moving from a more product-, than project-based, approach? What happens to security? And finally, what happens to the role of CIOs; what can/should they do?

Most interestingly: How will the entire industry be affected as companies not only adopt, but essentially offer, microservices or narrow cloud APIs? How do the trends of microservices, containers, devops, cloud, as-a-service/ on-demand, serverless — all moves towards more and more ephemerality — change the future of computing and even work? Cockcroft joins this episode of the a16z Podcast, in conversation with Frank Chen and Martin Casado (and Sonal Chokshi) to discuss all this and more.

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I’m editing this in my iPhone, using Git2Go. This is pretty nice!